Easy Weeknight Marinades Done Right

Grilled Tilapia2

I recently partnered up with the brand folks at Mazola Corn Oil to create this fun recipe for marinated grilled Tilapia with kiwifruit served over coleslaw. Mazola Corn Oil has more cholesterol-blocking plant sterols than other cooking oils, and can play an important role in lowering your cholesterol. It is a great source of healthy polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. Its mild flavor and high smoke point also make it a fantastic all-purpose oil great for general cooking, baking, grilling, sautéing and stir-frying, and can be used as a butter substitute in certain recipes. It’s also the perfect oil to use in your coleslaw and marinades.

Why marinades? Because they help transform the taste of the foods without adding lots of fat, sugar, and salt to your meal. I love using fruit-based marinades because they add a delicious sweet, tangy flavor while making your dish even healthier. Plus, fruity marinades are perfect for the grill! You can make the marinade in advance to save time during the week – just throw in your favorite protein and you’re well on your way to a flavorful, wholesome meal. My basic marinade calls for just a few simple ingredients you probably already have on hand, which makes it quick and easy.

I chose to use tilapia in this fish-based recipe because it is economical and widely available. For a healthy diet, the American Heart Association recommends eating fish at least two times per week. Fish is a low-fat, high-quality protein filled with heart healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Fish is also a great source of vitamins and minerals.

Below are the recipes for the marinade, tilapia, and coleslaw for a tasty and easy weeknight meal.

MAZOLA and Kiwifruit Marinated Grilled Tilapia with Crunchy Slaw

by: Rebecca Scritchfield, MA, RD, ACSM HFS

Serves 6

Simple 3-Step MarinadeMarinade1

½ cup of Mazola corn oil

3 kiwifruits peeled and chopped

4 minced garlic cloves

¼ cup of fresh chopped cilantro

2 tablespoons of lime juice

1 teaspoon of black pepper

2 tablespoons of salt

Add all ingredients into a shallow bowl, mix with a wooden spoon until well blended and place in a gallon size zip-lock bag. Add the tilapia, and let it marinate for 30 – 60 minutes in the refrigerator.fishinmarinade

Note: You may also make this marinade ahead of time keep for up to 1 day refrigerated.

Tilapia

2 lbs of tilapia

Preheat grill.  When grill is ready, remove marinated fish from storage container and place on hot grill.  Cook for about 4-5 minutes on medium heat. Turn once and grill other side for about 4-5 minutes until cooked through.  Serve over coleslaw with additional kiwifruit and lime to garnish.

Coleslaw

Grilled Tilapia31/4 cup white vinegar

2 T sugar

2 T Mazola corn oil

16 ounces or 1 half head of cabbage, shredded

1 cup shredded carrots

1 tsp salt

salt and pepper to taste

Mix vinegar and sugar. Add oil. Add cabbage to dressing and season with salt and pepper. Toss with tongs or fingers to combine. Adjust seasoning to taste. Let stand 20 minutes. Re-toss and serve.

Nutritional Information Per Serving:

Calories: 256

Protein: 32g

Carbohydrates: 10g

Fat: 11g

Saturated Fat: 2g

Cholesterol: 76mg

Sodium: 783mg

Fiber: 2g

Sugar: 8g

Share Your Favorite Grilling Recipes

What are your favorite marinades? Have you ever tried using fruit in your own marinades? Share your ideas in the comments below. Be sure to visit Mazola on Facebook to learn more health benefits and great recipes.

(Disclosure: I am currently working with Mazola as a paid spokesperson.)

 

Sorting Out Fact From Fiction: The Gluten-Free Diet Craze

Gluten free diets have become the latest weight loss “fad”. I think one of the reasons this trendy way of eating has evolved is that rather than working on incorporating balance and moderation into meals and snacks, it can be easier to cut something out altogether – whether that’s wheat, dairy or something else. What people may not know who are following a gluten-free diet for weight control, is that many times when gluten is removed from processed foods, sugar, fat and butter are often added to improve the taste.

wheat For most of us, there really is no medical reason to eliminate gluten. In fact, many gluten-containing foods can be very nourishing (ex: whole grain bread and barley). As this article summarizes, there really are only three true reasons to avoid gluten (and I’m sure it’s no surprise to hear that none of them are weight loss related):

  1. An autoimmune condition like celiac disease in which the presence of gluten actually alters the intestine and causes malabsorption and other GI issues like pain and diarrhea. This diagnosis can be made by a biopsy and blood test.
  2. An allergy, which would have symptoms that might appear similar to any other allergy – hives, sneezing, etc. This can’t be tested easily, but is evaluated similar to other allergies based on visible symptoms.
  3. An intolerance/sensitivity which may have symptoms like abdominal bloating, but can’t be accurately tested for.

I recently did a series of videos with the #OWNshow and @OWNTV which covered a number of gluten-related topics, including an overview of what gluten is, if going gluten-free makes sense for weight loss, identifying hidden sources of gluten in some foods, and uncovering some sneaky truths about some gluten-free products that are on the market today. Watch each video below: Can You Lose Weight By Going Gluten-Free?  Weight Loss Gluten Free

The Sneaky Truth of Some Gluten-Free Products  Sneaky Truth Gluten Free Products Could You Be Eating Gluten and Not Know It?  Hidden Gluten The Gluten Guide: What is Gluten Really? Gluten Guide  What do you think about the gluten-free diet trend? To join the conversation about going gluten-free, leave a comment below, use the hashtag #OWNSHOW on twitter, or check out the OWN TV Facebook page.

5 Easy Ways to Eat More Fruit and Veggies

We all need to eat more fruits and vegetables! Did you know over 2/3rds of Americans don’t meet the recommendations for fruit and vegetable intake?!  We typically throw away spoil fruits and vegetable two times a week on average, which translates into about $42 a week!
I am not saying you need to sacrificing taste or flavor or have to eat salads at every meal, I’m here to say “you can’t mess it up”!  Just add in fruits and vegetables to any dish you’re making. No matter what the recipes says, you can always add fruits and vegetables to any dish to help bump up the nutrition. Include a variety of fresh, seasonal fruits and veggies in your meals. They tend to cost less and since they’re at their peak they tend to be more flavorful and nutrient-rich. Below are some simple ways to help bulk up your diet with more fruits and veggies.

1. Blend meat with mushrooms. The trend is to blend!  Blend finely chopped mushrooms into any of your favorite ground meat dishes, like meatballs or meatloaf (I like to do about 50% meat 50% mushrooms).  You’ll increase the amount of fiber, vitamins, and minerals in your meal while decreasing fat and calories.  The finely chopped mushrooms blend so well with the ground meat that you’ll barely notice the difference. In fact, I think the mushrooms add moisture and flavor – mushrooms have umami flavor just like meat. Plus, substituting mushrooms for meat is a smart choice for your wallet, too!

Learn more about “blendability” from my friends at The Mushroom Council and try some fabulous recipes like these delicious looking Chicken and Mushroom Enchiladas Verdes. Grainfree-Enchiladas

Chicken And Mushroom Enchiladas Verdes
Chicken And Mushroom Enchiladas Verdes

2. Bust out the slow cooker

General Tsos

This image was reprinted with permission from http://mealmakeovermoms.com/ and http://healthyaperture.com

You really can’t beat a meal that cooks itself. The basic ingredients are protein (whatever kinds your family loves) and vegetables. Use water and herbs to add tons of flavor without a lot of sodium. Find an easy, delicious recipe you can follow like my General Tso’s Slow Cooker Chicken. The cost of making it at home is a fraction of what it costs to order take-out. My version costs about $13.00 and feeds 4 people whereas you’d pay that much for 1 entrée at a restaurant/for take out. Not only that, but you get to control the quality of ingredients that are used to prepare it. It’s a win-win!

Photo From: ohsheglows.com

Photo From: ohsheglows.com

3. Add veggies to a DIY smoothie

If you’re not crazy about eating your greens, incorporating them into your smoothies is a great way to disguise them!  It might sound weird, but you can use green vegetables like spinach, celery, and even kale and it can taste good! When you pair it with fruit like green apple or green grapes, it provide sweetness and I promise it does not taste like you are drinking veggies. This Peppermint Green Patty Green Monster Smoothie is kid-friendly and packed to the brim with deliciously minty and chocolatey flavor, with the added bonus of masking the spinach, you’re family will never know what hit them!

4. Go meatless burger

Black Bean Veggie BurgersDon’t think you can have a meatless BBQ?   Think again! Grilling isn’t just about meat, try adding something new to your barbecue spread. Veggie burgers can be made with chickpeas, black beans, white beans, potatoes, lentils, and pretty much any other vegetable that can be mashed and formed into a patty. Try this delicious Vegetarian Black Bean Burger recipe that’s perfect for your next gathering.  This veggie burger is a crowd-pleaser that even your carnivore friends will love.

5. Pack in the Fruit 

Fruit is an essential part of a healthy diet, delivering many essential vitamins and minerals, carbohydrates for energy and fiber for a healthy digestive tract. It makes for a smart snack, easy to drop in lunch bags or grab when on-the-go.

Take a break for some “afternoon energy” with portable good-for-you snacks, like blueberries! What’s easier than picking them up from the store and eating them right out of the container? Or you can make a portable snack ahead of time and bring it with you to work, like this Gluten-Free Spicy Blueberry trail mix.blueberry trail mix

Stay cool with this healthy and  fun kiwifruit pops dessert to make with your kids. They are so simple and really something the whole family will love. It’s just diced kiwifruit and 100% pineapple juice. This cold snack is so much healthier for you than your typical summer frozen treat.

I’d love to hear your tips and tricks to eating more fruit and veggies! Feel free to share your comments and favorite recipes below!

Debunking Cleanse and Detox Diets

It is a million dollar question: Are detoxes and cleanses all they’re cracked up to be? The idea that drinking juice or taking a magic pill is going to do a better job than our own organs is very misleading to consumers.  I recently sat down with ABC7‘s Suzanne Kennedy to explain why detox diets and cleanses are a waste of money, and could actually be doing more harm than good to your health. Check out the video clip below and be sure to read on to learn the truth behind the hype.

Continue reading

My Exciting Partnership with the Oprah Network

Drumroll please.

Roll out the red carpet – I am one step closer to Oprah!

I am absolutely thrilled to announce that I am working with the Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN) on a series of short segments about health, wellness, and weight.  I’ll be sharing my thoughts and perspectives on what it means to be healthy, common dieting mistakes, and how to make time for your very OWN happy hour every week.

If you know anything about me, then you probably know how I feel about dieting and finding the best weight for yourself.  When OWN asked me to share the #1 mistake women make when dieting, it was pretty easy for me to narrow it down: the fact that they are on a diet in the first place!  Throughout these segments we identify the common mistakes people make to derail their diets efforts. I explain the facts about the downfalls of dieting and bring focus to the different ways people can change their perspective on health, wellness, and dieting.

DIET DERAIL–Learn How to Be Happy in Your Body

SIZE DIVERSITY–Find Your Healthy Size

Here are some key takeaways

  • Dieting is not the same as healthy eating.
  • When you deprive yourself from foods you love it can often lead to overeating.
  • When you under eat and over exercise your body’s metabolism slows down and tries to prevent fat loss for survival.
  • Our DNA is what makes us unique, and there is no one perfect size for everyBODY.  We are not all meant to look alike.
  • Size diversity comes down to science and our genetic footprint.
  • If you are trying unsuccessfully to lose weight and are wondering what the problem is, maybe there isn’t one.  Maybe your body is happy there and your challenge is to become happy there, too.
  • Focus on balanced and realistic plan and avoid drastic, quick fixes. Ask yourself can I do this for the rest of my life?
  • Check yourself. Would you recommend your diet to your daughter or best friend?

Make your voice heard

I know I am not the only one who feels strongly that finding your best health and wellness is about more than a size;  it’s about finding a healthy balance, learning how to cultivate healthy habits, and accepting ourselves as we are.

Lending your voice can have a powerful influence on those around you.  Please help to encourage this positive attitude and spread scientific evidence-based information by sharing this video and with those you know and love.  We all would benefit from a better understanding of size diversity.

Feel free to share your comments and questions on social media. We’re using these hashtags and handles:

#OWNShow

@OWNTV

@DanishaDanielle (the host who interviewed me)

and, of course, @ScritchfieldRD (that’s me!)

I look forward to sharing my opinions throughout this series.  I hope that my messages will educate viewers on the negative impact dieting has on our health, happiness, and well-being.  Is there something you’d like to learn more about?  Leave a comment or tweet to share your topic ideas for upcoming segments – the cameras will be rolling again in April!

Fasting for Weight Loss is NOT the Answer

I was recently on WJLA ABC 7 to discuss the fasting craze that’s become a popular method for weight loss for many people. Unfortunately, most of what I discussed about it in the segment ended up on the cutting room floor. (I’m used to that expected consequences of editing stories). I wanted to take the opportunity to clear up some things that weren’t covered. I felt that the segment makes it appear that fasting may look like a good idea, and I don’t think it’s fair that the last word should look come across in that way.

You can watch the full video here — but read on below for some additional points that didn’t make the final cut.

Honor hunger — don’t hide from it

The key point that I made in this interview is that we need to honor hunger, not avoid it. Think about this — would you ever tell your child or best friend “sorry, it’s breakfast and you are hungry, you need to skip and wait until 12 p.m. to eat.” It’s irrational to ignore your biological signs. You can’t just manipulate when you will be hungry…and actually through fasting you could end up feeling ravenous and then end up overeating.

Operating on an empty stomach? No way!

Think about this…do you want to be on the road with someone who is driving you around while fasting? Or, would you want a doctor operating on you when they are fasting? I don’t know about you, but I know that I wouldn’t! Anyone who’s skipped lunch knows that at some point your brains stops functioning properly, and it impairs your ability to think clearly. Anything that does that to us can’t possibly be good for our bodies.

How do you honestly think you will do when you need energy for work, family, and exercise without nourishment?

Some fasts are more biologically concerning to me than others. For example, ones where you have days of eating 500 calories, give or take, is not enough for your brain to function even lying down all day.

Fasting and a social life do not mix

During the interview, I also talked about how fasting can get in the way of social occasions. The next time a friend asks you to meet them out for a meal, are you really going to say “sorry guys, I can only attend the brunch if it is after 1 p.m.” Or “I can’t go on Sundays because that’s my 500 calorie day. Can you do Saturday? I can eat whatever I want that day.” Oh and heaven forbid when it’s a birthday – YOURS??? And you find yourself feeling guilty for cake and ice cream.

Fasting is just not smart, rational, realistic or sustainable.

What’s the bottom line?

Fasting is a diet — and a dangerous one at that. The large body of science on diets (NOT just one or two studies) show that diets fail, and that 95% of people regain any weight lost. Many even end up gaining MORE weight than before they started. It’s like a doctor telling you, “take this pill, I guarantee you it won’t work long term.” You would not take that pill, would you?

Finally, fasting is disordered eating. It is a slippery slope between someone developing disordered eating habits and a clinical eating disorder. If your goal is health, you should not fast. You should work on behaviors you can do realistically for the rest of your life. The people in this segment were already exercising (a health move everyone should do) and they say they “fill their plates with protein, veggies and healthy fats, they feel satiated”. You can and SHOULD do that without having to fast and fight hunger.

Biologically fasting leads to increased risk of overeating so their claims that they avoid overeating, seem in contrast to what we know about human biology.  Again, you CAN and SHOULD avoid overeating without having to follow a fast and ignore normal hunger cues.

They say they maintain “a balanced diet” — yet they don’t mention carbohydrates, beans, or whole grains. I don’t know if it was an error or if they avoid those foods intentionally. I have shocking news: Carbohydrates are not the devil and they are needed to TRULY be balanced in your eating.

In addition, you can eat balanced without eating perfectly. You mean to tell me nobody who does this fast ever has a cookie, or ice cream — ever? Sounds too perfect to me, and perfect is the enemy of life long success.

If you want to get healthy, eat better, and exercise more, you should do it. But you don’t need a fast to get healthy. You need a food and nutrition expert – a dietitian who is actually trained to help you work with your body and become your best you! If you want to lose weight, make it permanent and that means working WITH your body, not against it. If you can’t do it the rest of your life, or would not wholeheartedly recommend it to family and friends, stay away.

Eating Disorders Coalition Hill Briefing: “Fear of Fat and Weight Stigma: The Intersection of Obesity and Eating Disorders”

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Last week the Eating Disorders Coalition held a briefing on Capital Hill that addressed issues around the negative health outcomes that can result from weight-based stigma and discrimination. They also discussed how important it is to take the focus off of obesity and size, and instead shift the focus to healthy behaviors. The panel of speakers included:photo 1

Below is a summary of their presentations:

Health Consequences of Weight Stigmatization and the Contribution to Obesity and Eating Disorders (Rebecca Puhl, PhD)photo 3    

Rebecca talked about what weight stigma actually is — people being treated negatively based on their weight. At one time or another, we’ve probably all witnessed some kind of negative images and words associated with people of larger size. It’s become a pervasive problem in our society. They’re often categorized as lazy, sloppy, and lacking the self control to just be a smaller size. It can happen at any age, whether it’s a child being picked on at school, or an adult being denied adequate health care at work. For women especially, it’s one of the most reported forms of discrimination, along with gender, race and age.

People who are victims of weight bias become more vulnerable for depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, poor body image, and are even more likely to commit suicide. In addition to the psychological trauma, they also experience poorer academic performance, inequitable hiring practices, and lower wages.

What many people don’t realize is that many people of larger size who are criticized for their weight, may actually be suffering from an undiagnosed eating disorder, like binge eating disorder, (BED) the most common eating disorder.

Many times the stigmatization isn’t  intentional. It’s coming from a place of wanting to guide a person towards health, but they don’t realize the negative implications that shaming a person to lose weight can have. Especially on children. She shared a number of examples of these misguided campaigns, for example:

georgiafatShe mentioned that research has actually found that ads like these that stigmatize larger-size people are less motivating and make them feel less confident about improving their health.

Campaigns were seen as the most motivating focused on healthy behavior changes instead of body weight and obesity.

She listed a number of other diseases/conditions that also had a stigma attached to them, for example leprosy, drug addiction and mental illness. However for these conditions (and many others) it’s been acknowledged that the stigma was a barrier to a person’s treatment, and as a result more research and funding was given to reducing that stigma.

The same needs to happen for obesity and eating disorders, so that proper treatment can be provided to the millions of people that need it. The key will be finding a way to shift our society’s focus to health as the ultimate goal, and not a specific body weight.

Binge Eating Disorder and DSM-5 (B. Timothy Walsh, MD)photo 4

As of May of this year, binge eating disorder is included as its own diagnosis code in the DSM-5. Dr. Walsh was able to share with us a little history behind how it came to be it’s own code, instead of continuing to fall under the umbrella of “Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified” (EDNOS).

Until this year, binge eating disorder was categorized under EDNOS, along with purging disorder and night eating syndrome. Binge eating disorder is defined as recurrent episodes of binging (without compensatory measures like purging), at least once per week for a period of 3 months. A binge episode is associated with at least 3 of the following: eating faster than normal, eating until uncomfortably full, eating large amounts even when not hungry, eating alone, or feeling guilt afterwards.

He shared the overwhelming evidence that supported BED as its own diagnosis, including, not limited to the over 1000 scientific articles published since the DSM-4, the lab testing that’s been done showing that binge eating behavior is abnormal, and the fact that people with BED don’t respond to routine weight loss treatments. This last piece being extremely important, as I’ve seen in my own counseling practice, because focusing on weight loss (for those with BED) actually can drive them deeper into their eating disorder.

Since it has become its own diagnosis in the DSM-5, one study that he shared shows the frequency of EDNOS has decreased from around 40% to around 15%, with BED coming in around 20%.

Why We Must Address the Intersection of Obesity and Eating Disorders (Chevese Turner)

photo 5Chevese started by pointing out that it’s first important to recognize that eating disorders are not rare. They affect around 20 million women, and 10 million men at some point in their lives, falling at different points in the “spectrum”. The perception that eating disorders can be seen as “rare”, yet obesity is an “epidemic” is just not true. In fact this “battle” that is going on against obesity, is actually happening at the expense of people’s lives (those people dying due to complications from eating disorders). She explained why it’s so dangerous to perceive eating disorders are so rare — that it’s due to the health complications that result from them going untreated, like:

  • abnormal heart rate
  • electrolyte imbalances
  • decreased bone density
  • muscle loss
  • tooth decay
  • high blood pressure and cholesterol
  • type 2 diabetes
  • depression
  • death

Around 70% of people with BED are considered overweight or obese, while 30% are considered a “normal” weight. Many people who struggle with it have suffered through countless weight loss treatments that not only didn’t work, but they actually exacerbate their disorder.

She called for people to have the courage to stop and look at programs that target people based on their size (whether it’s intentional or unintentional) like school BMI report cards or work wellness programs. The unintentional side effects are too damaging to ignore. 50% of kids who are overweight go onto have eating disorders later in life.

NIH spent $843 million on research related to obesity vs. $34 million on research related to eating disorders. In a perfect world she’d like those budgets to match, dollar for dollar, but that just isn’t the reality right now. The best thing we can do now, is to try and stop the stigma, so we can stop the shame, and the eating disorder cycle that can result from it.

The Invisible Eating Disorder (April Winslow, MS, RD)

April shared her very touching story about her struggle with and recovery from bulimia and binge eating disorder. Her binging started when she was younger, and then dieting/weight cycling as she got older. She was ridiculed at school, and pressured to lose weight by her family. During her constant losing and gaining, she talked about the fact that non one ever approached her about an eating disorder. The conversation was either “you’re too big, you need to lose weight”, or “you lose so much weight you look amazing” and then felt the pressure to maintain that new size. The latter was what led to the purging.

She recalled a doctor’s appointment while in the midst of her purging, when she was commended for her weight loss, and when she sought treatment and help, was turned away. It wasn’t until a close friend called her out on her purging that she began to acknowledge it, and then eventually could comes to terms with it to stop it. She changed her attitude about herself, and her behaviors. She started small, just walking a few minutes each night, and she started journaling to help work through her emotions.

Now, she’s a psychiatric dietitian, and celebrates food, friends and all life has to offer. Her story was so inspirational, and yet spoke so well to the need for changes about how we think about a person’s size and their health.

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